Visiting Weekends

Parents of FULL SESSION campers are welcome to visit. (Pemi does not offer a visiting option for parents of First or Second Session campers due to the shorter duration of their boys’ camp experience.) Parents of Full Session campers can choose one of our two visiting options. (In the case of shared custody, please contact Danny Kerr to request an exception to the one-visit policy.) This is a wonderful opportunity to see Pemi in action and to get a sense of your son’s “summer home,” where he is sure to want to show you around, introduce you to his new friends, and tell you of his discoveries and accomplishments.

When are the 2017 visiting options for parents of Full Session campers?

Option 1 (one day only)

Saturday, July 15 | 9:30 am – 8:45 pm
If leaving camp, boys and parents should return by 7:15 pm for campfire

Option 2

Saturday, July 29 | 9:30 am – 8:45 pm and Sunday, July 30 | 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
If leaving camp on Saturday, boys and parents should return by 7:15 pm for campfire

Which weekend should we choose?

Visiting weekends are “Pemi as usual” and campers are involved in sporting events and other activities. Option One tends to fall on a sports day with our neighbor, Kingswood Camp, with some age groups playing in events there (seven miles down the road) while others are held at Pemi. If your son is playing in a game at Kingswood Camp and you would like to watch, please adhere to their parking regulations. Thank you for understanding and for representing Pemi by adhering to this request. Your son can opt to go out with you instead of play, though we do encourage our boys to support their teams if at all possible.

What will we do?

Enjoy Pemi’s beautiful facilities and a meal in the messhall or take your son out to explore the surrounding New Hampshire and Vermont landscape and area restaurants. Stop by the office for maps and suggestions. Plan on attending the Saturday night campfire when the entire camp family gathers around the campfire circle. Many parents say this is a highlight event of their summer. A speedy farewell afterwards will facilitate the boys’ return to their cabins. Please do not walk your son back to his cabin after campfire. If he is feeling a bit sad at your departure, staff members will be nearby to support him with the transition.

Where to stay?

There are numerous accommodations within an hour of Pemi, ranging from cozy B&Bs to major chain hotels. Campers sleep in their cabins and do not join their parents at their overnight accommodations.

Driving directions>>

Top Tips for Parents Weekend

  1. Parents of new Full Session campers might want to spend plenty of time in camp with their son as well as out of camp. Allow your son to show you around and enjoy the facilities together. This confirms to your son that Pemi is a special place to be, and that he doesn’t need to be whisked away to have a good visit.
  2. Having parents visit, while wonderful, can rekindle some homesickness. Some Full Session campers might find this easier to manage when their parents visit the 2nd of the two options. (They have that weekend to look forward to after they say goodbye to their 1st Session friends and after welcoming their new 2nd Session friends, and once the 2nd visiting weekend is over, the end of camp is in sight with all the fun of Pemi Week ahead.) Don’t worry if the first visiting day is your only option; he’ll be fine!
  3. Boys may leave camp only with members of their immediate family – parents, grandparents, and siblings. If a Full Session boy’s family is unable to visit, he may leave camp with another family only if the Directors receive written permission in advance. Campers sleep in their cabins and do not join their parents at their overnight accommodations.
  4. When taking your son out, please do not fill him up with sugar and junk food! Not only might it imply that he’s deprived at camp, but the rest of the community, then, inherits the inevitable emotional sugar crash.
  5. No food is to be brought back to camp. Thank you for honoring this regulation. Any erosion of this rule, no matter how well-intentioned, tends to undermine the trust and respect for structure which we think are crucial to our community.